Chocolate Snowballs Recipe

Today I had a huge craving for something sweet, so I made some Chocolate Snowballs – an easy treat that you can freeze, is a favourite with kids and a no bake. In Finland, this recipe is a very traditional sweet and often the first thing that a child learns how to make in the kitchen, since they’re super easy, hardly any ingredients, no knives involved and no stoves or ovens! I remember learning how to make this at about five years old and I still make them – over 20 years later. We often have Chocolate Snowballs at children’s parties or on Saturdays – that are the Swedish and Finnish day when children can have sweets after dinner.

The Snowballs are also very easy to make vegan or gluten free. For vegan – use vegan or milk free butter. For gluten free – use gluten free oats. I always use the darkest cocoa powder that I can find, since it brings a deeper flavour and makes it a bit less sweet and sugary.

 

Ingredients;

300gr butter

3dcl sugar

6 tablespoons of cocoa powder

8dcl oats

4 tablespoons of water

2.5dcl (1 cup) shredded coconut

 

How to make them;

  1. Combine the sugar and the butter to a dough. The sugar and butter should be well combined and smooth. Use your hands for this.
  2. Add the cocoa powder, oats and the water and combine with your hands. Make sure that everything is an even dough and that there aren’t any specks of sugary butter left.
  3. Grab 2 flat plates. On one of them, add the shredded coconut and put the other one on the right hand side of the coconut plate.
  4. Roll little balls of the mix to smooth balls and the roll them in the coconut. Place the Snowballs on the empty plate.
  5. Once you’re done, put the Chocolate Snowballs in the fridge for a couple of hours to firm up and set.
  6. Enjoy!

What are coupons & why should you use them?

Coupons have been around for decades now, but few of us actually know how to use them, think that they’re something for old people or poor people. BUT! While it may be true that old people and people with limited means use them, middle class people use them too to help them save money and spend it on other things. Or, they’ve been inspired by a certain TV-show on TLC.

Have you watched Extreme Couponing on TLC or on the internet and now you want to do that for yourself, but don’t know where to begin? Well, look no further – this is The Poor Man’s Guide to the Galaxy’s very own “Couponing 101” crash course, which will teach you the foundations of couponing. Not extreme couponing like you see on the telly, but everyday couponing that will reduce your grocery bill by at least 40% every week – reasonable and responsible couponing! If you want to use these skills like the ladies (and gentlemen) of the TV show, go for it – just remember to not clear the shelves while you’re at it.

A coupon is a piece of paper (or a piece of data on you mobile) that has a specific value of a certain product or a range of products from a manufacturer, all specified on the coupon itself. Let’s say that you have a coupon worth 1£ off Pixie washing up liquid Platinum and the bottle costs 2.50£. That means that you get a 1£ rebate if you have the coupon scanned by the cashier at the checkout. The bottle will, after the coupon is applied, cost you £1.50 instead. However: you can’t cash in the coupon all by itself without purchasing the product that it’s valid on, as it holds no value without the product. It’s like a gift card, you can use it in the shop, but not exchange it for hard cash. Every coupon has a different value and ranges anywhere from 20p and up to about 1£. Those are the regular coupons and anything beyond that is called “high value coupons” because of their higher value. The high value ones are rarer and don’t get distributed as often as the lower valued ones. Coupons are also often called vouchers in the U.K.

These days you can find coupons of off anything, basically, from milk to microwaves and the sky’s the limit on the types of coupons that are out there. But why should you be using them on your groceries? Most people I meet say that it just doesn’t pay to clip, look for, print and use the coupons – they don’t save anything, or a minimal amount! Well, then you’re using them wrong. It’s like with anything, you need to educate yourself on how to use this to your advantage, which the vast majority don’t do. But, with the easy steps that I’m going to show you in this educational series you can save at least 40-50% on your grocery bill, without even feeling like it’s a lot of work. Honestly, who wouldn’t like to spend less for more? This doesn’t even mean that you have to compromise on what you normally eat, it just means a bit more planning but other than that – nothing changes. You can even use vouchers to save on other things that groceries; travel, holiday, everyday things like coffee (or covfefe…), going to the cinema, fast food etc. You can live a full life, with more savings to spend on other things; paying of your mortgage at a higher rate, pay your debts faster, student loans can be memory much faster and you can start building a savings account for your retirement or unexpected costs.

 

According to my calculations I’ve saved about 1200£ since I started using coupons 3 years ago; that’s 400£/year! And you could do even better!

 

 

Couponing 101 – now available on Fiverr

I’ve just joined the site Fiverr. If you’re not familiar with the site, it provides a ton of different services for 5$ and up and it’s everything from having someone draw a birthday card for you to someone tucking you in at night and singing you to sleep with songs.

https://www.fiverr.com/poor_mans_guide (my profile)

 

I’ve just started offering a course in couponing for beginners and it has 3 different tiers: Bronze, Silver and Gold – each with its own exclusive material! You can even have me coming with you to the shops for a personalised experience (T&C applies)! So, if you’re interested in learning what exactly couponing is and the foundations of it: click the link and reserve a package for you or your friends today!

 

MORE PACKAGES WILL BE AVAILABLE IN THE NEAR FUTURE! Please send a message or write a comment if there’s something you’d like me to sell on Fiverr.

11 ways to flavour your water

Drinking water is not only very healthy, it’s often the only drink a person with limited means can afford to drink at mealtime. But, at least how I see it, simply drinking tap water can become boring after a while. Adding some natural flavour, that are cheap and without added sugar, can really help you get enough fluid and make the water taste nice.

  1. Lemon and cucumber – a few thin slices each in a jug of water adds a really light and tasty flavour. Plus, lemon aids your digestive system!
  2. Cucumber – adding just some slices of cucumber makes the water taste fresh and makes you feel refreshed.
  3. Strawberries – if you’re looking for a sweet and hint of tart, then strawberries are the way to go. No sugar, just the natural sweetness of the berries. Tip! Freeze the berries before putting them in the jug – that cools the water and releases the flavour over a longer period of time.
  4. Watermelon – buy a whole melon when it’s on sale and add a few chunks of the melon in to the jug.
  5. Green apples – gives a sour and refreshing taste to water. Combine with lemon and it’s twice as nice!
  6. Watermelon and lemon – gives a sweet yet sour flavour to your table water.
  7. Ice tea – all you need is cold tea with a bit of sugar and some extra flavouring. Add a couple of slices of lemon and a teaspoon of sugar while you warm the water and boil for a few minutes before adding the tea. Let it soak until it’s strong and cool it. It’s a lot cheaper to make your own ice tea than buying it.
  8. Ginger and cucumber – if you’re in for something strong, feel a bit under the weather or just enjoy a strong taste to your water, then ginger is for you. Plus, ginger is full of antioxidants and aids metabolism.
  9. Red berries – strawberries, blueberries (technically a blue one, but eh) and raspberries. The easiest way to combine these are to buy them frozen in a premix – it’s also better for your wallet. Fresh fruits are expensive, I’m afraid, unless you’ve got a supply of your own.
  10. Oranges – Sweet and a bit sour, depending on what kind you’ve got and how ripe they are.
  11. Pears – can be anything from sweet to sour depending on what kind it is and how ripe they are. This one’s worth pairing up with something like green apples or watermelon.

 

Enjoy these tips and be sure to try out your own combinations to find your favvourites! Please, share your combinations for a chance to be added to the list.

The Poor Man’s veggie soup 

This soup is perfect if you’re on Ann extremely tight budget since you can use any veggies that are cheap or free, as long as you have vegetable stock and some cheap herbs like parsley and dill.

Ingredients:

  • Potatoes 
  • Onions
  • Carrots
  • Leek
  • Water
  • Vegetable stock cubes
  • Dill & parsley 
  • Swedish turnip 
  • Cabbage
  • Peas

Instructions:

  1. Cut all of the vegetables, except for the peas, into cubes and put all of the veggies into a large saucepan.
  2. Add the parsley, dill and cubes of stock.
  3. Cover with water and bring it to a boil quickly, before lowering the temperature.
  4. Let the soup simmer until all of the ingredients are cooked through.
  5. Adjust the stock flavour, it should be strong tasting to be extra filling and tasty.
  6. Serve with freshly baked bread.

Notice that I haven’t put any measurements or amounts – this is because you will have different amounts available to you at different times. This is what determines what amounts of what vegetables you use and how much you can/want/need to make of the soup. The point is that however much you make this soup is as cheap and simple as it gets, the highest cost is for the stock, parsley and dill.