Couponing terminology

In the world of couponing and saving money, there are lots and lots of special words that we use, that most people might not recognize.

Peel off coupon “peeile” – is a coupon that are stuck to a product and needs to be peeled off – hence the name “peelie”.

Catalina – Coupons that print at the register and can be for money off your next purchase, triple or double points, extra points or money off of a specific item or something like that.

Bogo – Buy one, get one (free/half price). It means that if you buy one item then you get another for free (or sometimes for half price)

Sale cycle – the cycle that shops use when they decide what items should go on sale and when. Different items have different sale cycles.

Stockpile (noun) – you pantry that’s full of items that you’ve bought for next to nothing to keep you until the next time you find coupons and/or the shop has it on sale.

Stockpile (verb – to stockpile is to buy a lot of things with coupons when the item is at its lowest sale price to make it last until the next time the price is good.

 

These are just a few words, but they are amongst the most important ones and I’ll update this as often as possible.

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Coupon Policies

It can be very difiicult to know what goes at what chain when it comes to coupon policies – who accepts coupon, who doesn’t and do they have any limits on the amount of coupons/vouchers that you can use in a single transaction. Therefore, I’ve created a page where you’ll find links to the various store chains in the U.K and their coupon policies. Some of them don’t have a policy and where that’s the case, I’ll try to contact them on social media or through their website to find the answers.

I’ll try and expand the page to the U.S too, but for now it’s the U.K. chains that I’m focusing on.

Chocolate Snowballs Recipe

Today I had a huge craving for something sweet, so I made some Chocolate Snowballs – an easy treat that you can freeze, is a favourite with kids and a no bake. In Finland, this recipe is a very traditional sweet and often the first thing that a child learns how to make in the kitchen, since they’re super easy, hardly any ingredients, no knives involved and no stoves or ovens! I remember learning how to make this at about five years old and I still make them – over 20 years later. We often have Chocolate Snowballs at children’s parties or on Saturdays – that are the Swedish and Finnish day when children can have sweets after dinner.

The Snowballs are also very easy to make vegan or gluten free. For vegan – use vegan or milk free butter. For gluten free – use gluten free oats. I always use the darkest cocoa powder that I can find, since it brings a deeper flavour and makes it a bit less sweet and sugary.

 

Ingredients;

300gr butter

3dcl sugar

6 tablespoons of cocoa powder

8dcl oats

4 tablespoons of water

2.5dcl (1 cup) shredded coconut

 

How to make them;

  1. Combine the sugar and the butter to a dough. The sugar and butter should be well combined and smooth. Use your hands for this.
  2. Add the cocoa powder, oats and the water and combine with your hands. Make sure that everything is an even dough and that there aren’t any specks of sugary butter left.
  3. Grab 2 flat plates. On one of them, add the shredded coconut and put the other one on the right hand side of the coconut plate.
  4. Roll little balls of the mix to smooth balls and the roll them in the coconut. Place the Snowballs on the empty plate.
  5. Once you’re done, put the Chocolate Snowballs in the fridge for a couple of hours to firm up and set.
  6. Enjoy!

Presenting new Blog Series next month

Starting next month, I’ll be presenting two new blog series here on The Poor Man’s Guide to the Galaxy! The working titles on the series are:

  1. The Poor Man’s Cheap Dishes from around the World 
  2. The Poor Man’s Beginners Guide to Coupons

The first series (The Poor Man’s Cheap Dishes…) will contain traditional dishes from different cuisines around the world – that are cheap and relatively easy to make at home from scratch. I’ll be visiting, for example; 

  • France
  • Thailand 
  • Mexico
  • UK
  • Finland
  • Sweden
  • China
  • Japan

I’m currently collecting recipes, at least 10, from each cuisine – which will be tested, documented and presented here and on my YouTube channel.

The second series (The Poor Man’s Beginners…) will be a ten part blog series about the fundamentals of couponing, and a bit of extreme Couponing as well. We’ll dive into the world of coupons and sort out the basics in ten easy blog parts, accompanied by videos on my YouTube channel! 

I’m also in the planning stage of a couple of other things, but that will be revealed at a later date!
Stay tuned for more!

What is a good price – X

So, I’m going to start writing a series here called: “What is a good price – X”, where I list things from shops and what price you should be paying for that item. Most things go on sale sooner or later and most shops have a sale cycle which they abide by, more or less at least. Usually it’s 6-8 weeks, but it depends on the store and your country. For example, here in Sweden the sales cycles are longer than, for example, in the USA. 
So, I’ll focus on one shop chain at the time, sometimes two if they have similar price settings. The blog posts will be updated continually, so check in once in a while to see if anything has changed. The first chain I’m going to start a “What is a good price – X” is ICA, a Swedish chain where I do most of my weekly shopping. When I move to London I’ll start with the British shop chains. The name for that post will therefore be: “What is a good price – ICA”.
If you’re living in the US, or any other country, and would like me to do the same thing with your chains, please contact me and we’ll set something up!